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May is Lyme Disease Month Live Well Fish Well

Did You Know That May is Lyme Disease Month Live Well Fish Well iBass360 ProTeam Member Kristilee Christensen Has been fighting this for several years now.  She has some great information on her page about how to prevent this debilitating disease Lyme disease is a bacterial infection primarily transmitted by Ixodes ticks, also known as deer ticks, and on the West Coast, black-legged ticks. These tiny arachnids are typically found in wooded and grassy areas. Although people may think of Lyme as an East Coast disease, it is found throughout the United States, as well as in more than sixty other countries.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease in the US every year. That’s 1.5 times the number of women diagnosed with breast cancer, and six times the number of people diagnosed with HIV/AIDS each year in the US. However, because diagnosing Lyme can be difficult, many people who actually have Lyme may be misdiagnosed with other conditions. Many experts believe the true number of cases is much higher.
Lyme disease affects people of all ages.
Ticks and the Risk of Lyme Disease Transmission According to Dr. Thomas Mather, director of the University of Rhode Island’s Tick Encounter Resource Center, finding a tick any time of year is scary because you don’t know what the insect is carrying. Dr. Mather explains that we should be wary of ticks during all seasons. Freezing temperature doesn’t deter deer ticks transmission of Lyme disease. Keep in mind that approximately 50-percent of adult female ticks can by carrying Lyme disease.
Sure, they may be slower moving in winter temperatures, but once the snow melts, they become mobile again in a matter of days. Dr. Anne Bass, a physician who specializes in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, vasculiti inflammatory eye disease at New York City’s Hospital for Special Surgery, also warns that ticks in the nymph stage (spring) can be as small as a poppy seed, Thus easy to miss in a full body check. However, researchers from the University of Rhode Island estimate that roughly 20-percent of tick nymphs are infected with Lyme disease
How to remove a tick

Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick as close to the skin’s surface as possible.

Pull upward with steady, even pressure. …

After removing the tick, thoroughly clean the bite area and your hands with rubbing alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.

We our extremely excited to announce the Newest Addition to the iBass360 Family Kristilee Christensen From Grand Rapids Minnesota

Kristilee has been professionally fishing mainly Bass Tournaments since 2012. Even with Bass being my true passion I am a very avid multi-species angler for both open and hard water. I absolutely love the competition side of fishing!

When not on the water or the ice you can find me at numerous Sport Shows all over the country. If I’m not fishing at least I am talking about it, promoting sponsors and educating people with similar interests.

I have been involved in numerous organizations and non-profits but one that remains a focus year after year is to me is the awareness of a much talked about but little known about disease call Lyme disease. I am effected by it daily and want to spread the word on how to be safe and protect yourself in the outdoor environments we all love! I look foward to showcase not only my passion for fishing but the causes that are dear to me. My goal is to educate and bring awareness all while Living The Passion!

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